Working at Home or Living at Work?

This week, I took a couple days away from my clinical practice for a “staycation.” Since I am not currently traveling (thanks, COVID-19), I chose to book a local hotel room (taking precautions, of course). As soon as I checked in, I felt a sense of relief that I haven’t had in quite a long time.

Photo by Roberto Nickson on Pexels.com (The view from my hotel room wasn’t quite this good, but I think the image captures how good it felt to finally leave the “office”)

There are so many things that I love about working from home. You can’t beat the commute, I haven’t forgotten my lunch in months, and I can involve my cats in my sessions. But the trade off is that I am quite literally living at work. I never leave the office for the day – instead, I go into the next room. On weekends, I have to go into work to get a sweatshirt. I used to joke during busy times that it felt like I lived at work, but now it’s true in a literal sense.

Part of being a psychologist means compartmentalizing my work life and my home life. This becomes much more difficult when I’m never more than ten feet from the office.

For any professionals reading this who are still doing the #WorkFromHome life, I really encourage you to find safe ways to get out of your office, overnight if possible. The last few days are the most relaxed I have felt since I left my real office on March 27, and I still don’t know when I will be back. Take care of yourself!

Photo by Madison Inouye on Pexels.com

Published by Amy Marschall, Psy.D.

Dr. Amy Marschall received her Psy.D. from the University of Hartford in September 2015. Her clinical interests are varied and include child and adolescent therapy, TF-CBT, rural psychology, telemental health, sexual and domestic violence, psychological assessment, and mental illness prevention. Dr. Marschall presently works in the Child and Adolescent Therapy Clinic at Sioux Falls Psychological Services in Sioux Falls, South Dakota, where she provides individual and family therapy and psychological assessment to children, adolescents, and college students. She also facilitates an art therapy group for adolescents and college students with anxiety and depression. Dr. Amy Marschall is certified in Trauma-Focused Cognitive Behavioral Therapy and Telemental Health.

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