Thoughts On Self-Diagnosing

Many people struggle to acknowledge when they are having trouble with their mental health, and this happens for a few reasons. First, stigma about what it means to have mental illness can put people in denial about their symptoms. They don’t want to be labeled “crazy” or “unstable.” Second, mental health is health that relatesContinue reading “Thoughts On Self-Diagnosing”

The Chicken or the Egg: Depression and Withdrawal

One thing many people already know about depression is that people who are depressed often withdraw socially. While it’s true that social support is an important component of alleviating depression, this sometimes gets misconstrued as, “If I want to help my loved one, I need to force them to be in social situations.” You mightContinue reading “The Chicken or the Egg: Depression and Withdrawal”

The Case for Primary Care Therapists

Stigma continues to be a serious problem in mental health, and anxiety about what it means to have a therapist can be a huge barrier to someone seeking services. Although we all have different life experiences and many people do not experience mental illness as defined by the DSM-5, every single person alive has anContinue reading “The Case for Primary Care Therapists”

Bubble Breathing

Breathing is probably one of the most basic things we do every day. We breathe constantly and without thinking about it, but when we get upset, our breathing changes. When someone feels scared, angry, or anxious, their breathing tends to get faster and more shallow, and we often don’t even realize this is happening! FastContinue reading “Bubble Breathing”

Coming Soon: I Don’t Want to be Bad

I am excited to announce that I’ve decided to self-publish my manuscript! I’ve been compiling worksheets and interventions that I use with kids and parents when the child has behavioral problems. I Don’t Want to be Bad helps parents understand their role in the child’s behavior and help the child learn to express and copeContinue reading “Coming Soon: I Don’t Want to be Bad”

Don’t Forget to Take Your Meds!

Happy Sunday to everyone! I created a video to review and talk about a product to help people with executive dysfunction remember to take their medication. Check it out! Here’s the TimerCap you see in the video, which can be purchased directly from their website!

COVID-19 and ACEs

In my Introduction to Trauma-Informed Teaching course on Skillshare, I talk about the Adverse Childhood Experiences study from the CDC and Kaiser Permanente. Basically, the study determined that certain stressful or traumatic life experiences in childhood have a huge impact in adulthood and can lead to mental illness, physical illness, and early death. Kids withContinue reading “COVID-19 and ACEs”

Therapy During A Pandemic

In April 2020, I wrote an article for The UpTake about telemental health and telepsychology. At that time, I had been working remotely for about one month and had just gotten certified in telemental health. I also thought that working from home was a short-term solution. Weeks have become months, and although schools are lookingContinue reading “Therapy During A Pandemic”

Normal Responses to Abnormal Situations

Bernice Lewis says, “Normal’s just a setting on the washing machine,” and she’s right. There is no one way to feel or be. But I think it’s important to talk about our “new normal,” or living in the era of COVID-19. The Washington Post says that 34 out of every 100 Americans has met criteriaContinue reading “Normal Responses to Abnormal Situations”

Happy Birthday, Robin Williams

According to Twitter, today would have been Robin Williams’s 69th birthday. In honor of that, I dug up something I wrote just after he died, which is still relevant today. Here are some myths and facts about suicide and mental illness: If he/she/they had had more/better friends, he/she/they would not have died. I addressed thisContinue reading “Happy Birthday, Robin Williams”